Annex 4 Dayton Peace Agreement

Annex 6 mandates a human rights commission “to assist the Parties in fulfilling their obligations under this Agreement”. [172] These “obligations” relate not only to the European Convention on Human Rights, but also to sixteen other “international agreements listed in the Appendix to this Annex.” [173] The Commission on Human Rights should be the agency responsible for the defense and promotion of human rights in Bosnia and Herzegovina. However, once again, the role of the body created by the DPA was to “help” and not to “investigate” [174] or to impose this case. Following the initialling of 21 November 1995 in Dayton, Ohio, the full and formal agreement was signed on the 14th Spanish Prime Minister Felipe Gonzalez, French President Jacques Chirac, US President Bill Clinton, British Prime Minister John Major, German Chancellor Helmut Kohl and Russian Prime Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin, testify to this. Two recent examples illustrate the real degree of convergence among the members of the Presidency. Firstly, Alija Izetbegovic`s visit to Saudi Arabia and Iran and, secondly, Zivko Radisic`s visit to Belgrade to meet the indicted war criminal Slobodan Milosevic. In the case of Izetbegovic`s visit, it was initially billed as a state visit, although the other members of the presidency were not informed of this or its purpose. [141] Finally, the trip, which caused a media riot, was billed as a private tour. According to public information from Jelavic and De Radisic that this was not a state visit,[142] Izetbegovic`s aide attacked Mirza Hajric Jelavic for his frequent visits to Zagreb in order to meet croatian President Franjo Tudman, for whom Jelavic did not receive official permission from the presidency. [143] Jelavic said in exchange that he never claimed state status for his visits to Zagreb. [144] Most of this Annex – Articles I to IV and Articles VI and VII – deals with the delimitation of the inter-entity boundary line (IEBL). Implementation thus seems to be complete. The IEBL is well defined and the only disputes seem extremely weak in detail, as they concern individual houses whose owners are upset to have been left a few meters from the “wrong” side of the IEBL.

Before the agreement, Bosnian Serbs controlled about 46% of Bosnia and Herzegovina (23,687 km2), Bosniaks 28% (14,505 km2) and Bosnian Croats 25% (12,937 km2). Among the weapons covered by the Florence Agreement and limited are combat aircraft, helicopter gunships, battle tanks, armoured fighting craft and artillery guns with a diameter of 75 mm or more, including mortars. The ceilings were generally respected. Most of the weapons that had crossed the borders had been destroyed, but some discrepancies under the category “historical collections” and the weapons held by the Ministry of the Interior – special police forces – pose problems. . . .